Skip to main content

About your Search

20130220
20130220
STATION
LINKTV 6
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
LINKTV
Feb 20, 2013 5:30am PST
pistorius, one of which is this issue about the trajectory of the bullets that were fired. could you tell us more? >> absolutely. this has all come out as part of the prosecution cost case. they are talking to the lead police investigator -- prosecution's case. they are talking to the lead police investigator. they believe that oscar pistorius had his prosthetic limbs on. there were four bulletholes in the door. they believe that he fired from an upright position, standing down upon reeva steenkamp. that is where the allegation has come from. >> there is a lot more evidence that is expected to come out. is there an expectation that this bail hearing will stretch onto beyond the current two days? it will stretch on for -- i don't think it will be over today. that is because of the really serious nature of the allegations being made by the police at this stage in the hearing. in the last hour, before they went into another recess, the defense launched another vigorous cross-examination of the police in an attempt to tear apart the prosecution's case. they called them up on several issues. the
LINKTV
Feb 19, 2013 7:30pm PST
're going with us. (thomas schatz) one thing that happens as we watch the film, that what we have learned to live with in terms of a character's psychology and set of behaviors, if pushed just a little ways, is pretty frightening. (henry sheehan) it becomes obvious as the film wears on that wayne does not want to rescue his niece, he wants to kill her. nope. our turnin' back don't mean nothin', not in the long run. if she's alive, she's safe. for a while. they'll keep her to raise as one of their own until -- till she's of an age to -- i can't imagine a film in 1956 talking about american fears of interracial sexuality in such an explicit way, outside the bounds of the western. stand aside, martin. no, you don't, ethan. ethan, no, you don't. stand aside. i think that jean-luc godard is supposed to have said he always cries when wayne chases after natalie wood, catches her and lifts her up and you are supposed to think that he's going to shoot her, or strangle her, or something. and he says... let's go home, debbie. (lindsay anderson) it works because ford was a canny filmmaker and he knew
LINKTV
Feb 20, 2013 2:00pm PST
of this church, this magnificent structure, i have asked father anthony to give us the historical background of its construction and the design of the decorative program of the interior. maria, welcome to our church on brotherhood way. thank you. the greek orthodox church of holy trinity. and i understand that you want to know some things about our church. yes, i do. students come to me and ask, following their programs that they're watching on television for telecourse, what happens to art following the roman empire and they mean the fifth century a.d.? isn't there any art for the next 500 or 400 years? does art simply pick up in the year 1000 with western romanesque architecture? and, of course, i say, "definitely not." there is such a wonderful era called byzantine art which lasted some 1,000 years. and this is the reason why we came here. so we're here. well, first of all, the church is a circular church in design. typically, this is not an orthodox architectural design. there is a church at thessalonica, greece, which is circular, goes back at least 1,500 years. most orthodox church is
LINKTV
Feb 20, 2013 8:00am PST
, universal, you're right. universal, that gravity extends everywhere. and what this equation tells us? the equation of gravity just tells us that there's an attractive force, 'f' between all things and for any two things that attractive force depends upon, is proportional to, is related to the product of the masses of the two things. this might be a planet, one. this might be another planet, two. those two planets are tugging on each other with the force that depends very much on how much mass they have, but it also peters out with distance square. as the distance between those planets or those chunks of matter or those particles, as the distance between increases, guess what happens to the force? just what you would expect to happen. - larger or smaller? - smaller. how many say, "oh, it seems to me "as the planets get further and further away, they pull harder and harder on each other?" stand up, i wanna see what you look like. nobody say that. but you see, we can say that statement here mathematically by putting this downstairs, huh? as that make the distance big, what happens to th
LINKTV
Feb 19, 2013 7:00pm PST
of america, as eli wallach recounts r us in "the western." (clint eastwood) he's another person adrift on the great west's landscape. that's always been part of the fun of the game is that lone figure on this huge landscape. and what's it like to be out there? it's another world out there. (clint eastwood) maybe he was just somebody who drifted along, happened by, and maybe he was asked for. it's that fantasy of a guy solving the problem himself. he isn't picking up and dialing 911 or other aid. through his own ingenuity, he's working out the situation. if he doesn't, he doesn't exist. you don't like our company? what's the matter with you? i'm speaking to you. (gunshots) (john sturges) everybody would like to be the fellow that says, i'll do it. i'm the one that can do it. everybody else tries, but turn to me, i can solve it for you. they want the magic touch, they want to be the legend. you liked good westerns and you may not have known why, but they were wonderful to watch. (budd boetticher) and it's very romantic. if movies could be a religion, you'd get more out of westerns than a
LINKTV
Feb 20, 2013 3:00pm PST
history of excavation "had such an amazing sight been seen "as the light of our torch revealed to us: "strange animals, statues, and gold. "everywhere the glint of gold. "we had seen enough. "we reclosed the hole, mounted our donkeys, "and rode home down the valley, strangely silent and subdued." brown: the discovery of tutankhamun's tomb in 1922 had an instantaneous and shattering effect on the world's imagination that continues to this very day. extraordinary numbers of visitors descended upon the tomb--sometimes to the point where the excavators were unable to function. egyptian motifs swept through the world of fashion and design. ashe whole worldthrilled t, death and the supernatural seemed to gin to prey upon the excavators. lord carnarvon died first--from the bite of a mere mosquito. as death closed over him in april of 1923, only a few months after the opening of the tomb, the lights of cairo extinguished with him. stranger still, at the same instant in england, s dog gave a terrifying howl and died. then georges benedite, the head of egyptian antiquities at the louvre museum
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6